annual gift man

It’s time for some of my favorite Christmas quotes, mostly from Bart Simpson, in no particular order:

“If a kid ever asks you how Santa Claus can live forever, I think a good answer is that he drinks blood.” – Jack Handey

“Christmas is a time when people of all religions come together to worship Jesus Christ.” – Bart Simpson

“Aren’t we forgetting the true meaning of Christmas – the birth of Santa?” – Bart Simpson

“Come on, Dad, if TV has taught me anything, it’s that miracles always happen to poor kids at Christmas. It happened to Tiny Tim, it happened to Charlie Brown, it happened to the Smurfs, and it’s gonna happen to us.” – Bart Simpson

Bart: “Hey, where’d that cool creepy Santa come from?”
John: “Japan. Except over there they call him ‘Annual Gift Man’ and he lives on the moon.”

Nothing can get me in the holiday spirit better than watching some Christmas specials from The Simpsons. I suggest you do the same.

7 thoughts on “annual gift man

  1. If you take the definition of division, then I think it is almost impossible to argue that you cannot divide something zero times. It would just leave you with a remainder equal to the number that you are initially trying to divide. At least, in practical math this is the case. So, if you are looking for the answer to 5 divided by 0, you would get any number * 0 subtracted from 5, and get 5 as the answer. Perhaps there should be the possibility of representing such an answer which covers all bases. We could come up with a new idea, and use a familiar symbol (“n” – which in theoretical math stands for any number). And therefore, whenever we divide any number by zero, we could simply denote the answer as “n remainder “. This would clarify to any certain degree that any real or non-real number would suffice. However, there would still be 2 partial answers that we derive from this equation. Such as anyone (especially anyone who has ever programmed) knows, there are actually 2 components to integer division, the integer answer and the remainder (which is derived by the modulo equation). Hereby, by making math apply to a stricter set of rules, whereas we are only interested in integer (or even whole unit [ie multiples of pi]), we can receive one answer, with 2 parts.

    However, implementing a system such as this one, we come to the obvious that division would no longer be the exact opposite of multiplication. Division would rather be the device we used to find the components of an equation that would always look like:

    * =

    The answer would also have to be accompanied with the dividend. This would be necessary, because reading that the answer to the problem of 5 divided by 0 is equal to 0 remainder 5 would lead to problems in finding exactness and in inequalities. Seeing that 1 divided by 5 is equal to 0 remainder 1, and 1 divided by 10 is equal to 0 remainder 1, we arrive at the point where taking into consideration of the factor applied throughout the problem is key. We would have to extend all answers to a format that would look like such:

    remainder factor .

    In conclusion, this is extremely convoluted. In all practical applications, it is just best to assume that any number divided by zero is undefined. I can deal with decimal points or even fractions better than a convoluted answering system for division.

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