seven drunken nights

As I went home on Monday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw a horse outside the door where my old horse should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that horse outside the door where my old horse should be?

Ah, you’re drunk,
you’re drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
That’s a lovely sow that me mother sent to me
Well, it’s many a day I’ve traveled a hundred miles or more
But a saddle on a sow sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Tuesday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw a coat behind the door where my old coat should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that coat behind the door where my old coat should be

Ah, you’re drunk,
you’re drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
That’s a woolen blanket that me mother sent to me
Well, it’s many a day I’ve traveled a hundred miles or more
But buttons in a blanket sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Wednesday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw a pipe up on the chair where my old pipe should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that pipe up on the chair where my old pipe should be

Ah, you’re drunk,
you’re drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
That’s a lovely tin whistle that me mother sent to me
Well, it’s many a day I’ve traveled a hundred miles or more
But tobacco in a tin whistle sure I never saw before

And as I went home on Thursday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw two boots beneath the bed where my old boots should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns them boots beneath the bed where my old boots should be

Ah, you’re drunk,
you’re drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
They’re two lovely Geranium pots me mother sent to me
Well, it’s many a day I’ve traveled a hundred miles or more
But laces in Geranium pots I never saw before

And as I went home on Friday night as drunk as drunk could be
I saw a head upon the bed where my old head should be
Well, I called me wife and I said to her: Will you kindly tell to me
Who owns that head upon the bed where my old head should be

Ah, you’re drunk,
you’re drunk you silly old fool,
still you can not see
That’s a baby boy that me mother sent to me
Well, it’s many a day I’ve traveled a hundred miles or more
But a baby boy with his whiskers on sure I never saw before

________________________________________________

http://chnm.gmu.edu/exploring/19thcentury/alienmenace/pop_cartoons.htmlI think this traditionally humorous Irish song (as sung by The Dubliners) is a wonderful example of the different natures of men and women. The man, simply drunk (every night of the week) after working hard to support his woman, is calm and rational, attempting to use logic to explain the obvious inaccuracies in his home. The woman then takes advantage of his drunken state to manipulate his perception and twist things in her favor. Of course, she tries to lie up until the very last stanza, regardless of the futility of her actions.

So the lesson is: never trust a woman, especially if you’re drunk.

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