literature

Belden’s Guide to Natural Science, History, Biography, and General Literature, Belden
Magner’s Farm and Stock Book and Complete Instructor, Magner
Diddling Considered as One of the Exact Sciences, Poe


Belden’s Guide to Natural Science, History, Biography, and General Literature

C. Belden, 1882

belden's guide

Belden’s Guide is a compendium of relevant scientific knowledge and the arts dating to the late 19th century. Its style is direct and accessible as the topics covered range from the natural sciences (astronomy, geology, meteorology) to history, biographical sketches, and an overview of significant literature. This book is a great asset to inquiring minds of all ages. It is 828 pages long and contains sketches and reproductions of lithographs and wood etchings.

Digital version (see accompanying discussion posts):


Magner’s Farm and Stock Book and Complete Instructor

D. Magner, 1902

This book, published in 1902, is written by the author of several well-respected farming and horse-rearing handbooks and encyclopedias. Magner’s Standard Horse and Stock Book was published as early as 1893 and as late as 1980, and can be difficult to find for sale. Even more rare is this far-reaching work, encompassing everything from pesticides to the practice of law, and containing numerous maxims and adages intended to create good neighbors. Topics include:

  • Soil amendments and nutrition
  • Growth and care of grasses, trees, fruits, and vegetables
  • Complete horse care guide, including afflictions and cures
  • Cattle, sheep, and hog care guide, also with common diseases
  • Medicines and remedies, law tips, and useful arithmetic

Magner intends to create successful farmers from those with a desire to learn, but he accomplishes more than that; his contribution is of significant historical and nostalgic value, in addition to the shrewd insight it provides. The book is 891 pages long, excluding appendices, plates, and index.

Digital version (see accompanying discussion posts):


Diddling Considered as One of the Exact Sciences

Edgar Allan Poe, 1856

http://www.eapoe.org/works/EDITIONS/grvolIV.htm

Published in the fourth volume of Rufus Wilmot Griswold’s collection The Works of the Late Edgar Allan Poe, this brief essay is proof of Poe’s versatility as a writer. It offers a substantially more lighthearted read than many of the author’s other later works and contributes greatly to the fields of sociology as well as the general understanding of human interaction. Through his poignant examples of “diddling,” the author reaches to the very core of humanity.

Digital version (Discussion)